Diets Disease Prevention Mediterranean Diet Information

Can Metabolic Syndrome Risks Be Reduced with a Mediterranean diet?

Researchers from Italy and Greece reviewed the results of 50 published studies as a part of a meta analysis which included a total of 534,906 participants. Meaning a statistical analysis of the findings of a similar analysis on the Mediterranean diet.

From the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, March 2011

Recently released information on the Mediterranean diet reducing metabolic syndrome risk.

Already well known to  be THE heart healthy diet of the ages, it is now also recognised to reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome. This is a cluster of risk factors which increase the risk of stroke diabetes and heart disease.

Someone who has 3 or more of the following conditions can be diagnosed with having metabolic syndrome.

  • Blood pressure 130/85 mmHg or higher
  • Fasting blood glucose equal to or higher than 100 mg/dL
  • Waistline measuring 35 inches or more in women
  • Waistline measuring 40 inches or more in men
  • HDL (good) cholesterol under 40 in men
  • HDL (good) cholesterol under 50 in women
  • A triglyceride count equal to or higher than 150 mg/dL

Researchers from Italy and Greece reviewed the results of 50 published studies as a part of a meta analysis which included a total of 534,906 participants. Meaning a statistical analysis of the findings of a similar analysis on the Mediterranean diet.

They found there were lower hikes in blood pressure from natural food based diets as well as a reduced risk of the same occurring with blood sugar and triglycerides. There was also less risk of a  drop in good cholesterol. All of these are negative factors in metabolic syndrome.

The news article then went on to explain that the Mediterranean diet is based on daily consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grain cereals, and low-fat dairy products; weekly consumption of fish, poultry, tree nuts, and legumes; high consumption of monounsaturated fatty acids, primarily from olives and olive oils; and a moderate daily consumption of wine or other alcoholic beverages, normally with meals.

Important: It also mentioned that red meat intake and processed foods are kept to a minimum.

The news piece was dated Wednesday, 20 April 2011.

…I hope this has been of value to you or someone close,

Ray Baker